Adding the Fujifilm X70 to my camera bag

Fujifilm X70

[Update: Be sure to see this post talking about me doing two days of street photography in San Francisco with the Fujifilm X70.]

A couple of years ago I made the switch from Canon DSLR’s to Fujifilm’s X series cameras – initially to the Fujifilm X-E2, then an X100S (since sold), then an X-T1, then an X100T – and, just now adding the new Fujifilm X70 to my camera bag. I’ve come to appreciate Fuji’s approach to cameras – and love shooting with them. There’s something special for me about Fuji’s design esthetic that creates a delightful experience when I’m out on the streets shooting with one of their cameras.

So, what spot does the new X70 fill for me? It’s that camera that’s always with me – but a step above the iPhone that’s always in my pocket.

What’s going to be interesting over the next couple of years is how those two converge – or collide. My iPhone 6s has a beautiful sensor – and a delightful Camera app that let’s me create wonderful images. The X70 is just a cut above – a photographer’s delight with all of the manual controls plus the integration with my iOS devices. They’re converging – but still different enough to be separate experiences. I not going to carry my iPhone on a wrist strap while walking the streets – and I’m unlikely to pull out the X70 if I want to take a quick shot of friends, a beautiful meal or a street scene that just materializes.

In other words, we’re still learning – and I’m enjoying the process. Someone once said a smart man is known by his tools. Both of these tools are superb instruments – converging in ways I’m yet to understand.

Into the Light in San Francisco

Spear Steet - San Francisco - 2016

Earlier this week I was in San Francisco for meetings – and I went in a bit early to do some street photography.

Here’s one of the first images I captured after just coming up from the Embarcadero BART station.

I was shooting with my Fujifilm X-E2 with the new v4.0 firmware. An amazing upgrade by Fuji to this great little camera!

Looking into the light is one of my favorite scenes – taught to me by looking at the amazing work of Fan Ho!

Scooter

Scooter - San Francisco - 2016

Yesterday was my first time on the streets of San Francisco after upgrading my Fujifilm X-E2 to the latest firmware update (V 4.0). One of the best things about using Fujifilm cameras is how they have regularly provided significant firmware updates to older cameras – and this update to the X-E2 is a significant one – especially to the autofocus capabilities of the camera.

This is an example – shot into the morning light using the camera’s zone focusing mode.

Hobart

Hobart Building - San Francisco - 2016

This morning I headed to San Francisco for a lunch meeting. I purposely arrived a bit early and did some street photography along San Francisco’s Market Street.

One of the special treats in San Francisco are the secret spots – the public spaces that aren’t well known. Since I was early, I headed upstairs to one of my favorites.

At the corner of Montgomery and Post Streets, there’s a Wells Fargo Bank branch. If you walk through the center door, you can take an elevator up to a roof garden that overlooks Montgomery/Post/Market. It’s a wonderful oasis in the midst of San Francisco’s busy Market Street scene.

This morning the light on the adjacent Hobart Building was just magnificent – both the direct sunlight on the right side and the reflected light on the left side.

Highway 1

Highway 1 - California - 2014

In June of 2014, I was up in northern California – in Humboldt County – for a workshop with Michael Frye. That time of year is pretty magical along the northern California coast – with the fog coming in overnight and – sometimes – burning off in the mornings.

On this particular day, we were heading south along California Highway 1 to our first stop. This image was captured in the car – following Michael’s – with my iPhone 5s heading into the morning light. One of my favorites from the trip!

Sunrise San Francisco

Sunrise - San Francisco - 2016

A few days ago I departed SFO on a flight that made a magical tour around San Francisco before we headed off to the southwest.

Here’s a look back at the sunrise – shot out the window with my iPhone 6S.

“We built this City” came to mind as a title for this image!

RCA Victor

RCA Victor - Havana - 2013

Along Havana’s Neptune Street was the old RCA Victor studio. This image is from January 2013. Apparently the building is mostly gone now.

Departing San Francisco

San Francisco

Yesterday I was outbound from San Francisco and our flight made this wonderful loop up and around the City itself. Fortunately I had a window seat on the left side of the airplane and had a window seat to all of this.

I snapped this image (along with many others!) using my iPhone 6s.

Below is a monochrome treatment of the same image.

San Francisco

Cuban Nights

Whites - Lady in Red - Havana - 2013
Whites – Lady in Red – Havana – 2013

I wrote yesterday about Paul Graham’s exhibition at Pier 24 in San Francisco. Graham’s exhibition features three different approaches to photography. One of his approaches he called “American Nights” – consisting of images that had a high key, sort of faded look.

While enjoying the whole show, I found Graham’s “American Night” images the most interesting of the exhibition – and wanted to try the technique on a couple of my images. Here’s my first example – “Cuban Nights” version of one of my favorite images from Havana in 2013 that I titled “Lady in Red”.

The whiteness was added to this image in Photoshop by adding a white Color Fill adjustment layer and adjusting the opacity to approximate what I saw in Graham’s images. The original image can be seen here – but don’t look at it until you’ve stared at this version for a bit of time and begin to see some of the details emerging. That’s the fun part of Graham’s technique – at least for me!

And it works especially well with large prints on the wall – more so than with this small web image version!

That Glance

Glance - San Francisco - 2016

Today I joined a group of friends to visit the current exhibition of Paul Graham’s work at Pier 24 in San Francisco. Pier 24 is a beautiful gallery for the display of photography – with large neutral spaces in many different rooms – and controlled reservation-based entry to minimize any feeling of crowding the in the space. It’s a joy.

Graham’s work was organized into three bodies of work: American Night (1998–2002), a shimmer of possibility (2004–06), and The Present (2009–11). In his video, Graham talked about how each body of work was based on one aspect of the camera. American Night was based upon aperture – overexposing the images to create the soft white images. A shimmer was based upon time – snapping multiple images in a sequence to tell the story of something in a series of images. The Present was based upon the use of selective focus – or very shallow depth of field – to shift the viewer’s attention to a different point of interest in each image.

After watching Graham’s video explanation of each – and walking the exhibitions, I came away really liking his American Night collection best of all. These images at first look like nothing – you glance and them and want to move on. But when you stop and spend time with each image, your eye begins to see details that you originally overlooked. As you move closer to the image, the effect is enhanced – you start seeing more. A lovely treatment – and something I want to play with in the future.

Meanwhile, as we departed Pier 24, I came across this man walking toward me in the shadows under the pier’s overhang. I grabbed a quick shot and then he sat down. I continued walked toward him – and asked him – with a quick motion of my hand with my camera asking if it was OK to take his picture. He said yes – and then I captured him in this pose glancing off to his left. One of those great moments when it all comes together in street photography!